Entries tagged with “Thomas Nelson”.


What is your deepest fear? We all fear something, tripping while on stage, having food in your teeth, or appearing over eager.  Fear is a normal part of life, but how we react to that fear says much about who we are.  In his newest book, Fearless, Max Lucado has this to say about how we handle fear (pg 5):

Fear never wrote a symphony or poem, negotiated a peace treaty, or cured a disease. Fear never pulled a family out of poverty or a country out of bigotry. Fear never saved a marriage or a business. Courage did that. Faith did that. People who refused to consult or cower to their timidities did that. But fear itself? Fear herds us into prison and slams the doors.

Wouldn’t it be great to walk out?

Yes.  It would be great not to be imprisoned by fear.  This book actually came at a pretty good time – we are in the final stages of buying a house and it has been a nightmare.  Our fears are that we would end up homeless for a short period of time or lose the house and have to find a place to move into mid-month.  Yes, I still am anxious about this problem, but Fearless helped me regain some perspective.

This is another great Lucado book that provides direct application to your life and provides lasting value.  He doesn’t resort to simple platitudes but embraces his own fears while providing opportunities for growth.  Ok, he does throw in a few one-liners that we all probably know, but they felt genuine and thoughtful.  Lucado talks about a variety of different fears that we might be facing.  He develops a case for why we shouldn’t be afraid of those things or how we can see God’s provision through them.

Many people think Christians and Christianity mean a perfect life with nothing bad ever happening.  He quickly puts that to rest with this quote on page 8:

Christ-followers contract malaria, bury children, and battle addictions, and, as a result, face fears. It’s not the absence of storms that sets us apart. It’s whom we discover in the storm: an unstirred Christ.

We face storms in our life.

Like most of his other books, Fearless, provides a section in the back for small group discussion or personal reflection.  My copy of the book from Thomas Nelson also included a shorter version of the book called, Imagine Your Life Without Fear, which also happens to be the subtitle of the book.

I’ll end with this great quote (pg 177):

There’s a stampede of fear out there. Let’s not get caught in it. Let’s be among those who stay calm. Let’s recognize danger but not be overwhelmed. Acknowledge threats but refuse to be defined by them. Let others breathe the polluted air of anxiety, not us. Let’s be numbered among those who hear a different voice, God’s. Enough of these shouts of despair, wails of doom. Why pay heed to the doomsdayer on Wall Street or the purveyor of gloom in the newspaper? We will incline our ears elsewhere: upward. We will turn to our Maker, and because we do, we will fear less.

Do not fear.

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Want a snippet of American history each day? This is your book.  Organized as a daily reader The American Patriot’s Almanac: Daily Readings on America can be read in short (2 minute) intervals throughout the year.   Bennett and Cribb offer a wide variety of historical anecdotes from throughout the USA’s history including some more obscure dates and events that I’d not heard of.

I’m a on again off again history buff so I was eager to read this book as part of the Thomas Nelson Book Review Blogger program.  Part of me was a little disappointed that the book sometimes almost preaches civic religion to the reader.  Nelson is a Christian publishing house and Bennett is a well known Christian author so the book’s tone at times makes it seem that American is tied up exclusively to Christianity and vice-versa.

It is no surprise given the book’s title that this paints an awe inspiring picture of what we have accomplished since the colonies were first settled.

The book is formatted by month and day, unlike some 365 day readers which just say Day 1, Day 2, etc.  At the beginning of each month is a longer essay about some component of American History.  The daily reading is a “this day in history” synopsis about a single event on that day.  Followed by a bulleted list of 4-5 other significant events that occurred on that day in history.

I would recommend this book as a way to get a small piece of history each day for you and your family.  It could also serve a good starting point for conversation about the impact of the particular event and whether it is good or bad.

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